Stuart Devlin candelabra
A 15½in (39cm) pair of parcel-gilt-silver three light candelabra by Stuart Devlin, hallmarked London 1970, guided at £4000-6000 to be offered at Catherine Southon’s sale on October 3.

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1. Stuart Devlin silver candelabra

Following his death earlier this year, the work of the influential Australian-born silversmith Stuart Devlin (1931-2018) is subject to reappraisal. In the foreword to a recently-published book celebrating Devlin’s work, Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip writes: "Stuart Devlin was probably the most original and creative goldsmith and silversmith of his time, and one of the greats of all time.”

Prices have not moved a great deal in recent years but this could change. Catherine Southon’s sale on October 3 in Selsdon, Surrey, will feature 80 lots from a single owner collection of work by Devlin.

While a number are the popular kitschy Christmas and Easter 'surprises', the top lot of the sale is a 15½in (39cm) pair of parcel-gilt-silver three light candelabra, hallmarked London 1970, guided at £4000-6000. Many of the lots were bought by the vendor at the Silver Vaults in London.

The auction can be accessed via thesaleroom.com.

2. Stuart needlework casket

Needlework casket

This mid-17th century embroidered needlework double casket is one of the lots at Woolley & Wallis’ Furniture, Works of Art and Clocks sale on October 3 in Salisbury. It is estimated at £15,000-25,000.

A fine mid-17th century embroidered needlework double casket is one of the lots at Woolley & Wallis’ Furniture, Works of Art and Clocks sale on October 3 in Salisbury. Worked with biblical and mythological scenes in coloured silks, silver braid, metal thread and seed pearls, it is in unrestored condition.

Reputed to be from a branch of the Pitt-Rivers family in Dorset, the 15 x 11.5 x 8in (38 x 29 x 20.7cm) casket is offered with an estimate of £15,000-25,000. Caskets and boxes such as this were made and used by young girls from affluent families between the ages of eight and 14.

The panels were sewn, typically with the aid of a paper template, and would be sent to a local cabinet-maker to be made into a casket.

The auction can be accessed via thesaleroom.com

3. Cream pots

Cream pots

Two cream pots from the Killeshandra and Newmarket Dairy Co estimated at £40-60 at Kingham & Orme. The auction house will offer nearly 200 lots of cream pots in its October 5-6 Asian Decorative Art & Fine Art, Antiques & Collectables sale.

Will cream always rise to the top? Auctioneers Kingham & Orme hope so as it is offering nearly 200 lots of cream pots in its October 5-6 Asian Decorative Art & Fine Art, Antiques & Collectables sale.

Among the numerous lots are these two cream pots from the Killeshandra and Newmarket Dairy Co estimated at £40-60.

The auction can be accessed via thesaleroom.com.

4. Alfred Swaine Taylor archive

Alfred Swaine Taylor

A photograph of Alfred Swaine Taylor to be offered at Lacy Scott & Knight's auction on October 5.

Over in Bury St Edmunds auction house Lacy Scott & Knight is offering more than 260 lots without reserve from the family of photography pioneer and medical writer Alfred Swaine Taylor (1806-80).

The Alfred Swaine Taylor family collection sale on October 5 includes journals, letters, medical and court case related notes and other personal items such as this mounted 8 x 10.5in (21 x 26.5cm) photograph of Taylor seated inscribed 'By Claudet circa 1857’.

When the auctioneers sold items from Swaine Taylor’s former home at Thorne Court in December, a number of early Victorian daguerreotypes from the 1840s and 50s took multi-estimate sums. Will bidders be equally impressed this time around?

The auction can be accessed via thesaleroom.com.

5. Charles II bearing cloth

Silk cloth

This silk and lace bearing cloth, believed to have been a gift from Charles II, will be offered at Batemans on October 6.

A pair of 17th century lace christening mittens and a silk and lace bearing cloth, believed to have been gifts from Charles II, are going up for sale at Batemans in Stamford on October 6.

Both the mittens and cloth date from the 1660s and come from the Orlebar family of Hinwick, Bedfordshire, loyal supporters of Charles’ restoration to the throne in 1660. When the grateful monarch visited the family in 1662, he is believed to have bestowed these gifts on the family after seeing Lady Orlebar was pregnant.

The turquoise silk bearing cloth, edged in silver threaded lace, is guided at £1000-1500 while the mittens are estimated at £600-800.

The auction can be accessed via thesaleroom.com.