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The fair was founded and is owned by Hali, the ultra-glossy textiles magazine which this year celebrates its 25th anniversary. Considering the timing and location of the fair, the idea of some integration with Summer Olympia seems a sensible move and Clarion Events, the in-house fair organising arm of Olympia, have taken over the organisation and marketing of the Hali.

Since its launch in 1998, the Hali fair made its mark and, with its colourful, vibrant exoticism, became a summer favourite of many.

But it had an identity problem, reflected in a number of name changes (all of which were a bit of a mouthful) and there was, in the past, considerable dissension between exhibitor factions as to the direction of the event.

There were murmurs from some of the more established dealers that other exhibitors’ stock was not up to par for a major international event.

However, this year looks like a new start and the inclusion of tribal art last year proved such a success it has become a very welcome permanent feature.

And the tie-up with Clarion Events means the introduction of the same vetting procedures as at the main Olympia.

Of all the June fairs, Hali, reflecting the goods it trades in, has always been the most international and among the more than 90 exhibitors showing this year are dealers from Austria, Denmark, Italy, France, Turkey, Sweden, Greece, India and the United States.

Last year’s introduction of a Gold Level will become a fixture allowing specialists at the very top end of the market to show work for the connoisseur.

Among this elite are London dealers Jonathan Hope and Michael Franses alongside international names like Galerie Achdjian from Paris and Moshe Tabibnia from Milan.

What was The Design Pavilion has been rechristened the D Zone, a large area devoted to artist-designed modern carpets and textiles with the latest original lines on sale.

Admission on opening day is £15, and £10 thereafter, which also covers entrance to the Fine Art & Antiques Fair.