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Spoon

Silver spoons have been used since ancient times and have a much longer history than the table fork, which did not come into general use until the 18th century. In England the introduction of hallmarks in the 14th century means a piece of silver can be dated and its locations identified.

The main variation to spoons often comes in the form of the stem, or more specifically the terminal. Henry VIII apostle spoons are highly rare and hugely sought after, while examples by makers such as Omar Ramsden, Sybil Dunlop or George Jensen carry a premium. Scottish and Irish silver spoons remain important sectors of this market.

Read ATG's detailed guide to silver spoons here


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Andro Gilmour makes his mark

17 December 2011

ONLY two Scottish 17th century lace-back spoons are recorded by the National Museum of Scotland so this example offered by Dreweatts at Donnington Priory was quite a rarity.

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Scottish Puritan scoops £27,000

23 August 2010

PURITAN spoons are not uncommon survivors in English silver but, for reasons still largely unknown, Scottish examples are very rare. To date, only nine hallmarked or provincial examples are known.

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Master Butcher shows how to fillet Scottish silver

07 February 2009

WOOLLEY and Wallis silver specialist Alex Butcher is well known for his expertise in the spoon world, but his most recent offering at the Salisbury saleroom took the specialisation a step further.

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Britton Smith spoons come to the fore

27 December 2008

BONHAMS’ latest silver auction was another sale of two parts. Around a third of it was devoted entirely to one specialist collecting field, early spoons, the bulk from one vendor, Mr Britton Smith.

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Spoonfuls of success in silver market

04 September 2004

When John Norie (d.2003) began his collection back in the 1950s, caddy spoons were not every collector’s cup of tea.

Provincial Scots are stars of capital’s silver

19 May 2004

OFFERED at Edinburgh’s Royal College of Surgeons, a 169-lot section of Scottish provincial silver provided many of the highlights at Thomson Roddick & Medcalf’s (15% buyer's premium) March 29 sale.

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The John Norie collection – a very special spoonful

08 May 2004

WOOLLEY & Wallis sold the first tranche of the caddy spoon collection assembled over the past half century by John Norie on April 20.

Tea and sympathisers

06 December 2002

Historians have spent many enjoyable hours attempting to decipher the symbolism of pictures on the back of Georgian teaspoons such as those illustrated right. Like the club tie or the secret society handshake, the picture back teaspoon was an English gentleman’s discreet method of signalling loyalties to potential sympathisers when serving afternoon tea.

A small scoop that adds to the overall picture

04 March 2002

The Caddy Spoon in the 20th Century, published by the Society of Caddy Spoon Collectors, Upper Nordens Clinic, Royal Oak Lane, High Hurstwood, Uckfield, East Sussex TN22 4AN, price £12.60 including p&p.

Ramsden’s loving spoonful

13 December 2001

THE best seller at Tennants’ sale on November 22-23 in the Yorkshire Dales was consigned by a Yorkshire family with connections to the famous silversmith who made it.

Spoon market needs stirring

16 November 2001

Owners of silver spoons are generally believed to have a head start in life, and the continuing bouyancy of this market might keep a few heads above water in the coming months.

Smith’s name sparks bidding battle over spoon discovery

13 August 2001

Sometimes the most famous names can be found in the unlikeliest places. Biddle & Webb auctioneer Nicholas Davies had been called out to view a Georgian drop leaf table in a local property but noticed this early trefid spoon, pictured, in a small box of cutlery.

Set of 12 Elizabethan lion sejant affronte spoons

31 October 2000

UK: The most comprehensive and perhaps the finest collection of early silver spoons to appear on the market since the 1960s went under the hammer at Woolley and Wallis in Salisbury last Wednesday (October 25).