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How they broke the bad news

21 February 2005

Back in the 1920s the Great Western Railway was amongst the pioneers of marketing. It produced a large array of promotional items, among which were the well-known series of wooden jigsaw puzzles made by the Chad Valley toy company, and sold on the railway’s bookstalls. Nearly 40 different puzzles were made.

Fine mantel clocks add to reputation of West Country

15 December 2004

By Kate Hunt WHILE large dispersals of clocks have always been rarities outside of the major London rooms, the West Country is becoming a new spot on the dial. Like Bath-based Gardiner Houlgate (see last week’s ATG), the auctioneers formerly known as The Bristol Auction Galleries, who now operate under the Dreweatt Neate banner, have built a good private as well as a trade following for the triannual specialist clock sections included in their antique sales.

Room warms to quality fire basket which goes at ten times the top hopes

13 October 2004

BEING part of a large company such as The Fine Art Auction Group has its benefits when it comes to sourcing consignments and sharing expertise, but, on a day-to-day basis, it does not always make the specialist’s life any easier when it comes to spotting sleepers.

Striking Olympics gold

08 September 2004

THE most topical entry in Clevedon Salerooms (15% buyer's premium) large 1200-lot outing on June 17-18 was a collection of Olympics memorabilia. Entered by descendants of the 1908 gold medal winning water polo player Thomas H. Thould, the group fetched £3300.

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The enduring appeal of Dyf

08 September 2004

COLLECTING fashions come and go, but the redoubtable Marcel Dyf (1899-1995) never seems to be short of admirers. This signed 23 1/4in x 2ft 4in (59 x 71cm) canvas, right, La Courbe de la Rivière, was the lone picture highlight of Dreweatt Neate’s (15% buyer’s premium) August 24 sale in Bristol when it sold to the London trade at £7600 against an estimate of £4000-6000.

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Return to the podium

10 August 2004

WHEN Mount Vesuvius erupted in 1906, the problems that beset the 1908 Olympic Games had begun. Rome, the intended host city for the games, was forced to withdraw and London stepped in with an offer to take over. A 68,000-seat stadium in White City, completed Athens-style at the eleventh hour, became the location for the fourth modern games.

Anglo-Dutch battle across board for India won at £13,500

23 March 2004

IF the performance of the 52-lot clock section of Bristol Auction Rooms (15% buyer's premium) March 2 sale was anything to go by, this firm’s reputation for selling timepieces is gathering pace.

The problem of identifying bonafide Boningtons…

23 March 2004

Illustrated in colour on the catalogue cover of Clevedon Salerooms’ March 4 sale was a watercolour described as being by Richard Parkes Bonington (1801-1828).

Talisman Fairs

04 February 2004

TALISMAN Fairs would like to point out that they are pressing ahead with all their dates in both Bristol and Bath.

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Caramanian pot pourri is a sweet £5000

15 October 2003

First introduced c.1809, the ‘Caramanian’ series represent one of Spode’s most popular early 19th century pattern ranges.

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A real corker! Harvey's Wine Museum Sale

04 October 2003

FOR Harvey's read Bristol Cream, but there is far more to this celebrated brand than the nation’s best known sherry.

Pair of 1750s Worcester gugglets

31 July 2003

With only seven others known to exist, this pair of 1750s Worcester gugglets was destined for success when offered on July 22 at Bristol Auction Rooms. Acquired fairly recently by a local private source, the 9in (24cm) high pair were originally estimated at just £400-600.

Bristol firm gets new lease of life

15 July 2003

DRAWING on long-ago mercantile wealth (don’t mention the slave trade or even, these days, tobacco imports) Bristol has for years rewarded visits by dealers looking for fresh material. But of late the city has been raising its profile as a premier league centre for antiques.

Rare monkey band automaton sells for £10,000

30 June 2003

Highlight of the remainder of the Roy Mickleburgh collection sold by Bristol Auction Rooms on June 24 was this rare monkey band automaton, c.1870. The nine-piece chamber orchestra includes no fewer than 43 separate movements operated by a French mechanism and is housed in a rosewood veneered two-part case with a 48-note German-made crankwind barrel organ below playing a choice of seven tunes.

Fine Art Auction Group add Bristol Auction Rooms to saleroom portfolio

02 June 2003

THE Fine Art Auction Group, who have been building a network of salerooms in the South East and South West over the past two years, have acquired Bristol Auction Rooms.

Sticks return to rare spot in the limelight

08 May 2003

IT’S been a long time since any auctioneer chose to illustrate his catalogue front cover with an array of silver candlesticks but this was the rather heartening decision by The Bristol Auction Rooms for their April 8 sale (12.77% buyer's premium inc. VAT) and their enlightened, so to speak, move was rewarded when all the lots, from George IV to 1967, sold within or above the admittedly modest three-figure expectations.

Specialist choice of settee underlines selective bidding

28 January 2003

“SELECTIVE” can mean “poor” when auctioneers apply the word to bidding and the downward spiral of brown furniture prices has emphasised this. But it was an accurate enough description of bidding on furniture offered among the 1200 lots at the Clifton rooms, for when there was a piece of unusual quality it sold well.

£10,000 Goldscheider goes clubbing

01 October 2002

The 1440 lots of 20th century decorative arts offered on the first day of the September 3,4 sale at the Bristol Auction Rooms (buyer’s premium 12.77%) included a range of ceramics, plus a dozen items of metalware and furniture, but the lot that really made the decorator trade sit up was this 4ft 1in (1.25m) terracotta creation, right, by Goldscheider.

Okimono sideways to success

18 September 2002

WE are used to seeing one-piece, tabletsigned, Japanese ivories in good condition make anything from £800 up to several thousand pounds at auction. But somewhat more surprising, given the selective state of the general market, was the high selling rate of low-grade okimono, right, at the Clevedon Salerooms (15 per cent buyer’s premium) in Bristol on September 5.

Ebonised Japanesque cabinet

10 September 2002

A 19th century Aesthetic movement ebonised Japanesque cabinet was orginally housed in the Yorkshire home of a Mr Mossman, a wealthy Leeds wool merchant. When he moved from his house in Menston, near Ilkley, the cabinet passed into the hands of the new owner, the well-known music critic Ernest Bradbury and has passed by descent ever since.