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Royal Worcester

Royal Worcester china is still in production today, notably the tablewares for which it has long been famous. The factory grew out of the Worcester porcelain factory which was established in the city in 1751 making porcelain tableware.

After various name and ownership changes during the late 18th and 19th century, it became known as Royal Worcester in 1862. At this time it produced decorative and ornamental porcelain in a wide variety of forms and styles.

During the 19th and first half of the 20th century, the factory was particularly renowned for the high quality ornamental pieces by artist decorators including Harry Davies; Harry and James Stinton, Richard Sebright and Dorothy Doughty.


First Period Worcester yellow ground mask jug

24 July 2000

UK: THE current fashion for English porcelain may lean towards the earliest pieces of blue and white, but it was not the case 30 years ago when the vendor of this First Period Worcester yellow ground mask jug, c.1760 purchased this piece for £3800 at the Grosvenor House Antiques Fair.

Porcelain tokens sell for £4900

24 April 2000

UK: TO the businessman in late 18th century rural England, these porcelain tokens would only have been worth a couple of shillings each, but to bidders at Dreweatt Neate’s Banbury salerooms on March 29 their value was to be measured in thousands of pounds.

The perfect Worcester palette

19 July 1999

UK: PERFECT for amateur painters of ceramics or the more dedicated collector of Worcester porcelain, is this mahogany cased set of ceramic colours, left, produced by Reeves and Son for Hancock and Son, the Victorian owners of the Royal Worcester factory.

Worcester wine funnel doubles estimate

01 June 1999

UK: A WORCESTER porcelain wine funnel c.1770 – of a particularly large size at 51/2in (14cm) high – printed in underglaze blue with butterflies and sprays of flowers.